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Every Thanksgiving, like so many other people, I will travel from my office to my family’s dining table. This Thanksgiving this trip will be about 10 feet long.

For a privileged class smaller than you might think (just 13.4 percent of working Americans as of August), the pandemic means home is still work and work is still home. During this holiday week, people take time out just to stay functional in their office.

The effects of this amalgamation of work and leisure will accompany us once again into the holiday season. As a culture, we are still adjusting to what the large-scale merging of work and leisure really means.

  • Working from home is challenging when you need some time off. “Companies would be wise to rethink standard working hours and rigidly apply parameters,” argues Ed Zitron.

  • Home is the future of travel. Call it a “workcation” (honestly or not). Our associate writer Derek Thompson met with Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky to discuss what the company’s recent increase in extended stays suggests about the convergence of work and vacation.

The message in three sentences:

(1) Five are dead after a man drove into a Christmas parade in Waukesha, Wisconsin. (2) A Georgia jury heard final arguments in the case of Ahmaud Arbery’s murder. (3) President Joe Biden appointed Jerome Powell to serve as chairman of the Federal Reserve for a second term.

Today’s Atlantic Approved Activity:

Listen to the new Adele album as you read our critic Spencer Kornhaber’s review: “May this album inspire you to knock on the walls of your own life and replace anything that fails the test.”

A break from the news:

Real men drive electric trucks.

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas and surprise you with moments of joy. Sign up to receive this in your inbox.